Single Review: The Feeling – ‘A Hundred Sinners (Come And Get It)’

“You get the distinct impression that they had more fun recording it than anyone would ever have listening to it”

2 STARS

Digital Release: August 28, 2011

Physical Release: N/A

In The Feeling’s world, ‘bad times’ are waking up and finding there’s no milk for breakfast, or finding a hole in your favourite checked shirt. And just when you thought things couldn’t get any worse for The Feeling, we’re presented a song that serves simply as more ammunition for their greatest detractors. Their jingle-friendly indie pop secured them a spot on the wave of sudden excitement about independent rock and indie bands back in 2004-2006. But by the time their second album was released, indie rock was already headed out of the back door of the music charts to make way for a half-baked attempt at pop revival, before that all changed around 2008 when synthesisers and drum machines became popular again. So in an attempt to remain of remote interest, third album ‘Together We Were Made’ was produced with more of an electropop vibe, but the fundamental problems with The Feeling still ring loud and clear throughout most of the record and in particular it’s indie-by-numbers second single ‘A Hundred Sinners (Come And Get It)’.

The Feeling don’t come across as a cohesive band as much as they do a group of men in search for a few good hooks, who then chuck them into a song with some uninventive lyrics about love and loss added in the hope it’ll make the song more appealing. ‘A Hundred Sinners (Come And Get It)’ has much debt to Take That’s ‘Up All Night’ only with all the folk-pop sensibilities providing the cheeriness, warmth and nostalgia stripped out and dressed back up again in an ill-fitting frock and made to pretend like it wants to dance till morning light when it’s own alcohol consumption rendered it catatonic by ten. Actually, that’s not a very good comparison – this song is so boring it’s practically teetotal. Alongside a plonking piano line and camp carnival-esque bass ditty, unlike Take That’s masterfully orchestrated guitars and brass, listening to The Feeling’s ridiculous musicianship is almost taking a ‘sight-seeing’ tour through Brighton, at night.

There’s not much on offer for the listeners on ‘A Hundred Sinners (Come A Get It)’. It sounds like a glorious title, and one that should’ve seen the band grow some balls at last but you get the distinct impression that they had more fun recording it than anyone would ever have listening to it – it’s pleasant enough; a jingle-jangle tune here, a sprinkling of catchiness there, and there’s little to actively hate about it, but there’s even less to love, the result being something that’s just annoying. And not even indie-pop’s staples of wheezing “Ahhh”s and Dan Gillespie-Sells trying to regain some masculinity by half-shouting the chorus (with hilarious consequences), can save it.

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3 Comments

  1. nikkih21

    It never fails to amaze me how much music journalists can bend the truth. 

    But by the time their second album was released, indie rock was already headed out of the back door of the music charts to make way for a half-baked attempt at pop revival, before that all changed around 2008 when synthesisers and drum machines became popular again. ‘ Correct me if I’m wrong but I take from that that you’re suggesting their second album didn’t do well because the genre was fasing out? – Their second album Join With Us went straight to number one and was released in 2008, so that sentence is entirely redundant. If you want to be a music journalist, check your facts first, I myself am interested in the proffession and think it really is the first thing to check to avoid annoying the fans.  Oh and just so you know, the first album was 2006 (there seemed to be some confusion there ‘2004-2006’) 

    With regards to your opinion on the single, fair enough everyone has their own views, but I struggle to see how you can praie ‘Up All Night’ and genuinely think that it’s better than A Hundred Sinners, especially when of late Take That have shown more than ever that they don’t give two hoots about the music as long as they can sit on huge piles of cash….

    Personally I think that The Feeling are one of the most genuine bands around, with a real passion for what they do and that really shows through their music – how you can say ‘with all the folk-pop sensibilities providing the cheeriness, warmth and nostalgia stripped out and dressed back up again in an ill-fitting frock and made to pretend like it wants to dance till morning light when it’s own alcohol consumption rendered it catatonic by ten.’ begrudges me, and to describe the song as ‘boring’ and ‘teetotal’ is beyond me. 

    Personally I think it is a wonderfully catchy, cheerful tune that never fails to put a smile on my face. But as I say, everyone’s entitled to their opinions. I hope you do take on board what I’ve said (sorry if I’ve waffled a little) and don’t just descard me as a ‘fan-girl’. I assure you I am a passionate music fan and as I say very ineterested in music. journalism. Thanks. 

    1. Dara Hickey

      I wouldn’t discard anyone as a fan-girl/boy, particularly if they cared so much as to write such a well-constructed argument as opposed to “OMG YOU A HATER LOLXXX.”

      But I take great pride in the fact I always check my facts before I write. I don’t feel right rattling off any old fluff without first checking my sources. I’m already very knowledgeable of moderm popular music and the charts, but when I need assistance I never fail to check my facts. 

      This review was no exception – indie pop/rock was almost completely obsolete by the time The Feeling released ‘Join With Us’. Yes, it hit #1 but has only sold 200,000 copies since it’s release date and is therefore certified Gold. In comparison, ‘Twelve Stops And Home’ (released 2006) charted and #2 but because the genre was far more popular at the time, it enjoyed greater longevity and has been certified 2x Platinum since it’s release date and has sold just a trifle under 1.5 million copies.

      The main reason for this is because after the first week or two, interest in the album depreciates exponentially; if there are no singles that can sustain interest, then the album tanks. I speak from the viewpoint of someone who actually enjoyed their first album (and I love the title track from their second – easily their best song by miles). ‘Twelve Stops And Home’ spawned three Top 10 hits which helped keep The Feeling in the public eye and people buying the album. ‘Join With Us’ only had one Top 10 hit released a week before the album and the rest of the singles (‘Join With Us’, ‘Without You’, ‘Turn It Up’) didn’t even scrape the Top 50, thus meaning there was no interest or hype about the album once the intial wave of purchases in the first week or so had diminished. And the reason these singles failed to set the charts alight was because radio and TV had no interest in them because everyone wanted pop; everyone wanted Scissor Sisters, Kylie Minogue, Madonna, Mika, The Hoosiers; throwaway pop that was almost as dispensible as the last wave of genre popularity.

      All this meant there was a perfectly good – and blindingly obvious – reason for ‘Join With Us’ to have a chart run of 1-11-18-27-37-OUT* and ‘Twelve Stops And Home’ had a chart run of 236-11-20-26-36-37-28-18-10574610-15-23-26-31-36-35-37-41-28-24-30-35-31-25-19-18-20-22-24-15-16-16-27-35-OUT.*

      And the reason ‘Together We Were Made’ turned out D.O.A. was because, again, there is no interest in them anymore. This isn’t necessarily because they’re a bad band, but mainly because there’s nothing particularly ‘interesting’ about their music anymore – it’d easily spawn hits back in 2006 but times change. Five years is enough to potentially destroy music careers – look at Christina Aguilera, Shayne Ward, Scissor Sisters, et al.

      And going back to an earlier accusation you made: 2004-2006 is when indie pop/rock took over. It was the introduction of The Killers, The Kaiser Chiefs, Keane, White Stripes, Kasabian, Arctic Monkeys, Franz Ferdinand (late 2003) as well as The Feeling, so I’m not wrong.

      So please don’t say that I bend the truth – I always back up my statements with facts. And with regards to my comparison to Take That’s ‘Up All Night’ – the musical intention is strikingly similar. “Everyone’s come out for a party where anyone and everyone’s invited. Let’s all have a lovely, quintessentially British gathering out in the sun with lots of alcohol and gingham” – it’s that type of celebratory theme that runs vividly through both songs. And ‘Up All Night’ was released before any of the ‘Progress’/’Progressed’ nonsense.

      *Source: Chartstats.com

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